Sunday, January 11, 2015


The Arabian Mau is a formal breed of domestic cat, originated from the desert cat, a short-haired landrace native to the desert of the Arabian Peninsula, which lives there in the streets and has adapted very well to the extreme climate. The Arabian Mau is recognized as a formal breed by few fancier and breeder organization and cat registryWorld Cat Federation (WCF) and Middle East Cat Society (MECATS). Based on one landrace, the Arabian Mau it is a natural breed.

It is medium in size, with a body structure that is rather large and firm, not particularly slender, and with well developed musculature. The legs are comparatively long, with oval paws.The head appears round, but is slightly longer than broad. The nose is slightly concave curved, when viewed in profile. The whisker pads are clearly pronounced, with a slight pinch. The chin is very firm. The eyes are slightly oval, large and slightly slanted. The cat may have any normal cat eye colour, and there is no relation between the eye and coat colors, usually Arabian Maus have bright green eyes. The ears are large, slightly forward and sideward-placed, high-set on the skull.[1]The tail is generally of medium length and tapers slightly towards the tip.The coat is short and lying close to the body. It has no undercoat and is firm to touch. It may not be silky, but is noticeably very glossy.
The desert cat has been a landrace native to KuwaitQatarSaudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates for more than 1,000 years. Desert cats are well adapted to the hot, Middle Eastern environmentGenerally Arabian Mau cats have very loving temperaments. The main feature of this cat breed is their devotion, love and affection for the owner. This cat will always be a reliable companion of an individual that loves his cat and cares for it. Arabian Mau gets along very well with children and different kinds of animals. These cats are neat and take care of themselves very well.Arabian Mau cats were adapted to a desert life style and had to hunt for food themselves; possibly because of this they are not picky about food and they seem to love eating. They like to play and so this breed is very active and curious. They are good hunters, quick and agile. Cats that are allowed to go outdoors, will easily catch a prey and bring it back home. These cats easily jump and jump high. Outdoor cats like to walk around their territory and their house; Arabian Mau are very territorial breed. Males always guard their territory from other male cats.
Females are medium sized and elegant; however, males can be very huge. They have muscular bodies though females are slightly smaller. Their legs are long with perfectly oval paws. They have large ears. The tail has medium length with tapering toward the tip. The head appears to be round, but it is slightly longer than broad with well-defined whisker pads. Ears are large and well set. Their eyes are oval and match the coat color. The fur is short and without any undercoat; besides it lying close enough to the body. The coat should not be silky. The colors can be different but the most recognized are red, white, black, black and white, brown and brown tabby..Arabian Mau breed has good health. Kittens are born strong and healthy, as the Arabian Mau cats have a good immune system. Both pedigreed cats and mixed-breed cats have varying incidences of health problems that may be genetic in nature. Arabian Mau's are generally healthy cats, as they are a natural breed.

Saturday, January 10, 2015


Dandie Dinmont Terrier is a small Scottish breed of dog in the terrier family. The breed has a very long body, short legs, and a distinctive "top-knot" of hair on the head. A character in Sir Walter Scott's novel Guy Mannering has lent the name to the breed, with "Dandie Dinmont" thought to be based on James Davidson, who is credited as being the "father" of the modern breed. Davidson's dogs descended from earlier terrier owning families, including the Allans of Holystone, Northumberland.There are three breed clubs in the UK supporting the breed, although it is registered as a Vulnerable Native Breed by the Kennel Club due to its low number of puppy registrations on a yearly basis. The breed is friendly, but tough and is suitable for interaction with older children. There are no breed specific health concerns, but they can be affected by spinal issues due to their elongated body and the breed is affected by canine cancer at a higher than average rate.
The breed has short legs, with an elongated body. Unusually among Scottish terrier breeds, it has pendulous ears. The neck is muscular, having developed from the breed's use against larger game.The typical height at the withers is 8–11 inches (20–28 cm), and they can weigh anywhere between 18–24 pounds (8.2–10.9 kg). While the Dandie generally is a hardy breed, it may have issue climbing stairs.They have a silky coat which forms a "topknot" on top of the dog's head.The Dandie Dinmont Terrier has a similar body shape to the Skye Terrier, but the Skye's coat is thicker and longer.The coat comes in two colour ranges, either "pepper" or "mustard". Pepper ranges from a dark blueish black through to a very light silvery gray, while the mustard can vary from reddish browns to a fawn where the head appears to be almost white. Typically, the legs and feet are of a darker colour with the lighter colour on the body slowly blending into that on the legs.The depth of the coat can reach up to 2 inches (5.1 cm). The colour of the coat is usually set by the time the dog reaches eight months of age, but the Dandie Dinmont Terrier will continue to mature physically until around two years old.

The breed is tough but usually friendly, and are suitable for older children. It makes both a good companion and a guard dog, but are among the most docile of the terrier breeds and are usually quite undemanding of their owners. However they are known for their ability to dig large holes in a short space of time. They can be trained to be good with cats, but should not be trusted around smaller animals such as hamsters or rats. They are described as being "very game", in that they are prone to challenging other animals including foxes, and in some cases other dogs.Due to the breed's elongated body, there can be back issues within the breed specifically with intervertebral discs in the dog's backs. These discs can sometimes "slip" resulting in spinal disc herniation. Any symptoms relating to this can depend entirely on what part of the dog's back is affected, and can range to paralysis with loss of bladder and bowel control in the worst cases.
Following work by the breed clubs to ensure that any reoccurring health issues are dealt with, there are no especially common conditions affecting the Dandie Dinmont Terrier. However, minor issues affecting the breed can include hypothyroidism, primary closed angle glaucoma and Cushing's syndrome. In order to combat glaucoma in the breed, the breed clubs recommend that Dandies should have a procedure called a gonioscopy conducted on them at regular intervals throughout their lives. The Dandie is also at slightly higher risk of canine cancer than average. The average life expectancy of a Dandie Dinmont Terrier is 11–13 years.


hedgehog is any of the spiny mammals of the subfamily Erinaceinae, which is in order Erinaceomorpha. There are seventeen speciesof hedgehog in five genera, found through parts of Europe, Asia, Africa and New Zealand (by introduction). There are no hedgehogs native to Australia, and no living species native to the Americas. Hedgehogs share distant ancestry with shrews (family Soricidae), with gymnures possibly being the intermediate link, and have changed little over the last 15 million years. Like many of the first mammals, they have adapted to a nocturnal way of life.[3] Hedgehogs' spiny protection resembles that of the unrelated rodent porcupines and monotreme echidnas.The name hedgehog came into use around the year 1450, derived from the Middle English heyghoge, from heyghegge ("hedge"), because it frequents hedgerows, and hogehogge ("hog"), from its piglike snout. Other names include urchinhedgepig and furze-pig. The collective noun for a group of hedgehogs is array or prickle.

Hedgehogs are easily recognized by their spines, which are hollow hairs made stiff with keratin. Their spines are not poisonous or barbed and, unlike the quills of a porcupine, cannot easily be removed from the hedgehog. However, spines normally come out when a hedgehog sheds baby spines and replaces them with adult spines. This is called "quilling". When under extreme stress or during sickness, a hedgehog can also lose spines.Hedgehogs are primarily nocturnal, although, depending on the species, they may be more or less active during the day. The hedgehog sleeps for a large portion of the daytime either under cover of bush, grass, rock or in a hole in the ground. Again, different species can have slightly different habits, but in general hedgehogs dig dens for shelter. All wild hedgehogs can hibernate, although not all do; hibernation depends on temperature, species, and abundance of food.
The hedgehog's back is made up of two large muscles, which control the positioning of its quills. There are about 5,000 to 6,500 quills on the average hedgehog, and these are strong on the outer surface, but filled with air pockets on the inside. The hedgehog uses its quills to protect itself from predators, using muscles which draw their quilled skin to cover their full body, and pulling in the parts of their bodies not covered, such as their head, feet, and belly. This form of defense is the hedgehog's most successful, but is usually their last resort.Hedgehogs are fairly vocal and communicate through a combination of grunts, snuffles and/or squeals, depending on species.Hedgehogs occasionally perform a ritual called anointing. When the animal encounters a new scent, it will lick and bite the source, then form a scented froth in its mouth and paste it on its spines with its tongue. The specific purpose of this ritual is unknown, but some experts believe anointing camouflages the hedgehog with the new scent of the area and provides a possible poison or source of infection to predators poked by their spines. Anointing is sometimes also called anting because of a similar behavior in birds.Similar to opossums, mice and moles, hedgehogs have some natural immunity against snake venom due to the protein erinacin in the animal's muscular system (although it is only available in small amounts, and so a viper bite, for example, may kill the hedgehog anyway).